Gregorio Marañón Hospital, a pioneer in augmented reality surgery

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Gregorio Marañón Hospital, a pioneer in augmented reality surgery

Dr Rubén Pérez Mañanes showing how mixed reality technology works. Photo: Government of the Region of Madrid.
Dr Rubén Pérez Mañanes showing how mixed reality technology works. Photo: Government of the Region of Madrid.

Our country has shown once again that we are at the forefront of medical innovation: the first surgical procedure using a mixed reality headset has been performed at Gregorio Marañón University Hospital.

The Madrid-based hospital is a pioneer in augmented reality surgery. Thanks to its collaboration with the Spanish firm Exovite, its doctors have been able to use the Microsoft HoloLens headset in a real surgical procedure for the first time.

 ‘We’re the first in the world to have developed a mixed reality system for X-ray images in the operating room. We’d been the first to use 3D printing in cancer surgery, back in 2014. Now we’re combining 3D printing, mixed reality devices and real surgical procedures,’ says Dr Rubén Pérez Mañanes.

HoloSurg is a system to handle interactive clinical information on the patient, thus shortening surgical procedures and making them more accurate.

Relying on virtual and augmented reality technology, surgeons can map out MRI and CAT scans, X-ray images or even 3D tumour models in the operating room. This means having all the information available at all times when performing the procedure.

Besides, doctors can share the holograms with fellow specialists, which makes the procedure more efficient and minimises surgical risks.

Committed to innovation

Through the Biomedical Research Foundation and the Musculoskeletal Tumour Unit, Gregorio Marañón Hospital develops and implements next-gen 3D imaging and positioning technologies such as 3D printing or surgical navigation.

Together with Exovite, Gregorio Marañón is working on the features of augmented reality goggles to guide surgical procedures by identifying surgical instruments and finding specific anatomical areas on a patient’s body.